Dinkey Lakes Wilderness

Central Sierra Nevada

Wilderness lakes
Courtright Reservoir w/ CLIFF LAKE trailhead

Dinkey Lakes California

Dinkey Creek Road
Tom Harrison Dinkey Map East of Shaver Lake, Hwy 168

30,000 acres

Sierra National Forest

Located in the high elevations between Shaver Lake and Courtright Reservoir is the Dinkey Lakes region. Granite domes and alpine lakes are the key feature of this mid-Sierra forest. John Muir Wilderness is located on the east (right) side of Courtright, while Dinkey Lakes Wilderness is on the opposite west (left) side.

  • alpine lakes
  • backpacking
  • camping
  • creeks & streams
  • cross country ski
  • fishing
  • granite domes
  • horseback trails
  • hiking trails
  • off-roading
  • rock climbing
  • snowmobiling
  • snowshoe
  • stargazing
  • wildflowers
  • wildlife viewing

4 wheel drive trails serve some of the Wilderness boundaries. Dusy Ershim OHV Trail (pronounced ‘doosey’) crosses the boulder strewn terrain for 30 rugged miles, from Courtright to Kaiser Pass. Road #8S10 is known as ‘Red Lake Road’ and pretty popular among 4x4s and fishermen. This high clearance 4×4 trail accesses both scenic lakes – Red Lake and Coyote Lake, as well as Dinkey Wilderness trailheads.

Trailhead Access:

Access the trailheads on the north side of Dinkey Creek Road, a paved route which connects Shaver Lake to the Sequoia McKinley Grove and then on to Wishon and Courtright. Rock Creek Road #9S10 becomes dirt and leads up to the Dinkey Lakes hiking trails.

Paved Dinkey Creek Road leads out to the Trails End trailhead. Dinkey Creek and main Campground is located at 5840' elevation and tucked deep in the forest, about 10 miles east of Shaver Lake. Beyond the Sequoia grove is Wishon & Courtright Reservoirs w/ Cliff Lake trailhead. All the other trailheads located at these large lakes lead over to John Muir Wilderness.

Paved Dinkey Creek Road leads out to the Trails End trailhead. Dinkey Creek and main Campground is located at 5840′ elevation and tucked deep in the forest, about 10 miles east of Shaver Lake. Beyond the Sequoia grove is Wishon & Courtright Reservoirs w/ Cliff Lake trailhead. All the other trailheads located at these large lakes lead over to John Muir Wilderness.

The Dinky Creek locale (on most maps) is located at the main Dinky Creek Campground, along Dinky Creek near the historic Dinky bridge on a small, paved, side route north of the main road. Although this summer vacation area is well signed, people can often miss this turn, especially at night.

DSCN0005

USDA map Two main hiking trail systems can be accessed from the west, via Tamarack Ridge (parking at Hwy 168). Both dirt routes from highway, Road #9S09 and Road #8S10 lead out to Dinkey trails, although one is rugged 4×4 trail, Red Mountain OHV, and the other is a long, graded dirt road.

Kaiser Pass Road to the north side has even more trails leading into Dinkey. Badger Flat and White Bark trailheads are closest points to Huntington Lake, CA. Bolsillo trailhead is way back near Florence Lake, which also has a major trailhead and paved parking.

NFS

 

local rangers:

Sierra National Forest
High Sierra Ranger District
29688 Auberry Rd
Prather, CA 93651
559-855-5355

Secluded Camping
4×4 Camping at Coyote Lake

 

Ishi Wilderness

Bridge and Chute from top of Black Rock

NorCal Ishi Wilderness

41,840 acres
20 miles N of Chico, CA
Lassen National Forest

  • Barkley Mountain (elev. 4488′)
  • Black Rock Campground
  • Deer Creek
  • Flat Iron Mountain (elev. 4400′)
  • Iron Mountain (elev. 3274′)
  • Indian Ridge Campground
  • Mill Creek
  • Peligreen Place
  • Pine Creek
  • Pinnacle Peak (elev. 3293′)
  • South Antelope Campground
  • Twentymile Hollow

Up in the mountains behind Chico sits a rugged landscape of deep canyons lined with bizarre rock formations and roaring mountain creeks. Wilderness encompasses lower elevations – ranging from 1500′ – 3500′  – making this outdoor destination a winter haven, when the rest of the backcountry is covered in several feet of snow. One of the most historic wilderness areas in the state, as the aboriginal existence of the Native Americans came to an end in this area.

COHASSET ROAD climbs up the volcanic fin of Cohasset Ridge into the pine forests high above the valley floor. The paved road becomes dirt and the road name changes to Ponderosa Way (Lassen Road# 28N29). The Ishi Wilderness can also be accessed from the north side via Highway 32, near the Tehama State Game Refuge.


View Larger Map

  • backpacking trails
  • hiking trails
  • fishing creeks
  • horseback trails
  • wildlife viewing

 

Ishi Wilderness mapIshi Wilderness Map

Ishi Wilderness


Agua Caliente Hot Springs

Agua Caliente Springs

Agua Caliente County Park
Agua Caliente Anza Borrego Desert
Agua Caliente Hot Springs

East San Diego County
N of Ocotillo, CA

Anza Borrego Desert MapAgua Caliente Hot Springs County Park is a remote 910-acre San Diego County Park next to the Anza Borrego Desert. A developed hot springs, picnic area & a large campground. This desert destination is perfect for California winter recreation, offering a small air strip for small plane pilots.

Located North of Interstate 8 on San Diego Road S-2 on the south end of Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. Local mountain’s seismic forces created the fault that runs beneath this region & forces water up to tRV campground Anzahe desert surface. A decent water supply also supports plant life & wildlife.

For minimal crowds AVOID THIS PLACE on holiday weekends or peak winter months. Spring & Autumn are excellent times to visit here, but watch the weather forecast for any heat waves. Who wants to soak when it’s 100 degrees outside?

2 natural hot mineral pools:

  • large outdoor pool is kept at natural 96 degrees
  • glass walled indoor pool is heated & has bubbling jets
  • spring-fed, warm showers are available
  • hiking trails, horseshoe & shuffleboard

Indoor Pool

Agua Caliente Campground

140 campsites – tent sites & RV hookups w/ dump station. Shady trees only at some camp sites. Indoor pool, outdoor pools, maybe a hike-in primitive tub too. Individual campsites may be reserved up to 12 weeks in advance 858-565-3600

  • Anza Borrego Desert Map
  • San Diego Backcountry Map

  • View Larger Map

    Anza Borrego Hot Springs
    Several nice camp spots line this canyon on the north side.

    Kern River Hot Springs

    Kern Hot Springs

    Kern River Hot Tub

    From Lake Isabella down to Bako, along Hwy 178, numerous natural hot springs can be found in this lower Kern river canyon. Old Kern Canyon Road has plenty of primitive spots to camp along the road, way above the Kern River. This Southern Sierra Nevada scenic route, a 20 mi winding narrow paved road, is the old highway that leads up to Bodfish CA.

    At least a dozen dispersed camp sites can be found along the Old Kern Cyn Rd, some spots with views over canyon, some hidden & shady, many spots are level & large – suitable for RVs. No facilities, no fees, just a flat, dispersed site. Campfire permits are required for fires outside of developed Campgrounds & fire restrictions are often high, so no fires are allowed much of the year. Most of the gates on the Lower Kern are now locked & only accessible by Forest Service personnel, ranchers or local rafting companies with permits.

    2 developed Lower Kern Campgrounds are located on the Old Kern Canyon Road, which parallels the 4 lane portion of the highway: Hobo Campground & Sandy Flat Campgrounds, if you really need a picnic table & bathroom. You can reserve camps by clicking the links.

    Miracle Hot Springs – next to Hobo Campground. This hot tub park is closed for good. A few portable bathrooms, picnic tables & trash bins, the hiking trails clear; 2 shallow pools partially filled. Maybe enough room to soak your butt, but not fully submerse yourself. Someone really needs to renovate this place! Update 2012 – the signs for Miracle are now completely gone.

    Remington Hot Springs

    This one is by far the most popular now that Miracle is gone. The hike-in only access doesn’t deter people much and many choose to set camp overnight close by. The local authorities are always making the rounds to double check on the area – which is good for security and bad for the 2 AM party animals.

    Kern recreation

    Democrat Hot Springs

    private resort now open? Heck, I dunno. (2017, democrathotsprings.com is down. They might be trying to promote a River Festival held in May.)

    The hotel and cottages were constructed to accommodate guests that came in stage coaches to dine and relax during the early 1900’s. Five springs on the property flow at 115 degrees into large soaking tubs and a swimming pool. Closed to the public for more than thirty years, the resort is once again ready to be brought to life for groups and private events only.

    Kern recreation

    The hot springs listed below are Private Property, so don’t get caught – and don’t get shot:

    Delonegha Hot Springs

    Concrete tubs were built by homesteaders, later a hotel and boarding house were constructed. Stage coaches from the San Joaquin Valley took 2 days to get visitors to this area. The hotel closed in 1912, when more accessible areas of Democrat and Hobo were built. Remaining cement tubs run along a rock peninsula overlooking the Kern River; water temperatures average 112 degrees. This private property is fenced.

    Scovern Hot Springs

    Also known as the Hot Springs House. 1902 mud baths were being offered and the wooden tubs were replaced by galvanized tubs. A swimming pool and bath houses were added when the Scoverns bought the property in 1929. Bath house burned to the ground in 1971 and only a vacant lot remains. Steam can still be seen in the fields across from the springs, where water runs at 140 gallons a minute @ 115 degrees.


    NEARBY TOWNS –

    ALTA SIERRA CA

    KERNVILLE CA

    LAKE ISABELLA CA

    WOFFORD HEIGHTS CA

    MAP OF THE KERN RIVER –

    Sequoia National Forest Map

    Kern Hot Springs

    Eco Camping California

    eco-friendly camping
    eco-wise camp tips

    bearcmp

    You manage to drag yourself off the couch, congratulations! You’ve packed up your ride and are heading out to your favorite “secret” spot. Anticipation builds as you arrive and pull into the empty lot. Your heart sinks however when you discover that your once pristine camp spot has been transformed into the new town dump. An old lawn chair, candy wrappers and beer cans litter the area that you once loved. Impromptu fire rings are strewn about and armies of weekend warriors have trampled your favorite meadow into a dust bowl.


    duh… DON’T BRING THE CITY TO THE WILDERNESS. The noise, the soda cans, the beer bottles, the fast food wrappers, the broken plastic crap. The disposable society we have created now makes us all too LAZY. Getting off your ass and outdoors means you need to take some responsibility. You get some much needed exercise, breathing fresh air, and become a new person while discovering new destinations and awesome terrain.

    unaware

    Litterbugs include many types of folks: disruptive teens, toothless alcoholic contractors, local yolkels, urban mishaps, gangster wanna-bes, home boys, totally oblivious yuppies & even uneducated families…

    let’s keep the trash, the diapers & tagging in the cities!

    EDUCATION is key on this matter & it starts right here with you.
    Please pass along good outdoor ethics!

    wilderness volunteer

    tread lightly wilderness trail crews

    Seems you can’t go deep enough. The further into the forest you go, you still seem to see it – evidence of neglect for our land. In every outing these days, we constantly notice tons of litter and graffiti. Deliberate disrespect for the open spaces and valued wilderness lands. What is going on here?

    Please report graffiti in action to the local law enforcement or nearest rangers office! Or better yet, get them on video and post it on YouTube.com

    Garbage while Camping
    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Misuse and sheer disregard is how OUR lands get closed (by OUR OWN government). Closed off forever, turned into ‘off limit’ roads and more totally closed wildernesses, that only can be explored on foot. OHVs, dirt bikes, 4x4s need to realize their overall impact on natural habitats could have a detrimental effect on these lands. There is a balance. Play wisely. This includes all the red necks with guns too.

    STORY: San Berdu takes action on illegal dumping


    King of Litter?

    Originally uploaded by danamight

    Graffiti, Soda Cans, and Cigarette Butts are a nuisance to nature.

    As more and more office drones venture from their cubicles and out onto the unbeaten path, they leave behind the remnants of their bold treks for all to see. Refuse, human waste, smoldering campfires and crushed flora from selfish tent placements and trail blazing destroy our fragile eco-system and pollute the environment for years to come.

    • Be cautious walking around to avoid destroying the fragile ecosystems, such as meadows, seedlings, wildlife & wildflowers.
    • Pick up all your trash & even some left behind by previous campers. Leaving the camp or picnic site in better condition than you found it.

    Below are some simple tips that, coupled with common sense, will enable you to stop being part of the problem and start being part of the solution!

    Cleaning Up Litter

    Litter ay Camp

    Garbage on the Back Roads
    Wilderness Ethics

    Litter seems to be nearly everywhere. Although there are trash cans at most campgrounds & developed picnic areas, some lazy folks still seems oblivious to the fact that their ignorance is causing an eye sore for the rest of us. Does that bunny rabbit really need to look at your abandon water bottle in the bushes, for the next 7 years?

    littercup

    Remove Trash while Camping & Picnicking

    • Pack it In; Pack it Out, means if you bring it out there, please take it back home (or to a proper garbage disposal site).
    • Bring work gloves when camping; do messy job faster and have clean hands
    • Bring trash bags or cardboard boxes for storing trash for transport
    • Take out some litter; Leave the camp or picnic site cleaner than you found it
    • Use existing campsites & fire rings to prevent impacting new areas
    • Pitch tents in cleared camp spots only (when primitive camping)
    • Do not set a tent up in a meadow. It’s a fragile environment

    graf_kern_i

    tread lighty
    leave no trace
    and always leave the site nicer than you found it

    desert camping

    Sespe Hot Springs

    Sespe Hot Springs
    Los Padres National Forest

    Backpackers Below

    Sespe Wilderness
    Los Padres National Forest

    hike

    Sespe Hot Springs is one of the hottest thermal springs in the California coastal region. The unique springs, leaking from a cliff high above, leaves a red mark down the white rock wall and it is too hot to touch near the source. Scalding is possible in Sespe Gorge!

    Several clearings and tent spots are located in the sandy canyon, between the cottonwood grove and the springs source. Stack river rocks and boulders to create your own soaking tub and relax. Do bring your backpack and plan on spending the night, cuz if not it’s an 18 mile RT hike (done as a day hike – it can be very long and rough). Weekdays are best for seclusion and having the whole place to yourself. Weekends are the prime time for SoCal trekkers to arrive.

    DSCN3022

    Sespe Trail MapGrade Valley Road – The access to Sespe Hot Springs trailhead is via Lockwood Valley Road; west of Frazier Park about 12 miles. Take the backroad #7N03 (Grade Valley / Mutau Road) southbound  into the forest and traverses 13 miles of rough dirt road to reach the small dirt parking lot. Deep inside this route, you are now totally surrounded by Sespe Wilderness. Both Thorn Meadows Campground and Half Moon Campground are located back here on the main dirt road. A dead end dirt road is the trailhead for Sespe Hot Springs.

    Via Johnston Ridge – The access trail is LONG, with a lot of up and downs, changing in elevation, thru pinyon pine forest and oaks, along dry dusty ridges, very exposed. Cottonwood trees line the large canyon at the Hot Springs.

    3 access trails to Sespe Hot Springs

    Johnston Ridge Trail

    Sespe River Trail

    Alder Creek Trail

    Ojai Rangers Trail Description (PDF)

     

    hike Another hike is the soaking tub @ Willet Hot Springs

    NFS

    Los Padres National Forest
    Mt. Pinos Ranger Station
    34580 Lockwood Valley Rd
    Frazier Park, CA 93225
    661-245-3731

    Haze in Los Padres

    Trinity Alps Trailheads

    Trinity Alps Wilderness Trailheads
    NorCal Hiking Vacations

    Meadow on Trinity Alps Long Canyon Trail

    Northern California, Trinity Lakes
    Shasta Trinity National Forest

    • backpacking
    • camping
    • fishing lakes
    • hiking trails
    • horseback trails
    • waterfalls

    Trinity Alps Wilderness

    hike

     

    Trinity Wilderness trailhead locations –

    trailheads from Highway 3:

    • Scott Mountain (PCT access)
    • Bear Creek
    • Eagle Creek
    • Stoddard Lake
    • Boulder Creek
    • Big Flat
    • Swift Creektrinityalps_lg

    trailheads from Highway 299:

    • Canyon Creek
    • Hobo Gulch
    • French Creek
    • Green Mountain
    • Jim Jam Ridge
    • East Fork
    • New River
    • Grizzly Camp

    trailheads from Highway 96:

    • Tish Tang
    • Red Cap Lake
    • Bear Hole
    • Mill Creek Lake
    • Salmon Summit

    trailheads from north @ Salmon River, Cecilville Rd #1C02:

    • Hidden Horse
    • Trail Creek
    • Carter Meadows Summit (PCT access)
    • Middle Boulder

    Trinity Alps Wilderness Trail
    Overview @ SummitPost

    Trinity Alps Lakes & Waterfalls

    Trinity Wilderness Lakes & Waterfalls

    Grizzly Falls -- Trinity Alps Wilderness

    Northern California Lakes
    Shasta Trinity National Forest

    NFS

     

    Trinity Alps Wilderness

    lake

     

    Lakes & Waterfalls in the Trinity Alps region –

    Canyon Creek Fallstrinityalps_lg
    Trinity Lake
    Josephine Lake
    Hidden Lake
    Caribou Lake
    Lost Lake
    Grizzly Lake
    Sapphire Lake
    Papoose Lake
    Emerald Lake
    Conway Lake
    Barker Lake
    Foster Lake
    Boulder Lake
    Cecil Lake
    Lion Lake
    Ward Lake
    Mirror Lake
    Long Gulch Lake
    Trail Gulch Lake
    Fox Creek Lake
    Red Cap Lake
    East Boulder Lake
    Middle Boulder Lake
    Big Boulder Lake
    Big Bear Lake
    Big East Fork Lake
    Little Bear Lake
    Canyon Creek Lakes

     

    Trinity Alps Lake

    Where to Camp

    Where to set Camp in California?
    Camping Spots
    Small campgrounds have fewer facilities than the larger developed campgrounds, but less sites means more nature and less people. Roughing it on the back roads with dispersed camping is by far the best experience for seclusion and privacy

    real peace and quiet.

    Primitive, free camping requires more thought and planning than just pitching a tent in a flat spot at a developed campground.

    First off, you will need a decent topo map to find the dirt back roads, the trailheads and the creeks with the best camp sites; a dependable and capable rig to get you out there, plus your camping gear.

    Campfire permits are usually required for camp stoves, BBQs and any open fires. (bucket & shovel needed).

    And most importantly, since California is known for its super dry climate and seasonal wildfires, make sure to check with local rangers to find out about any current campfire restrictions.

    Streamside Camping
    some tips for a good camping experience – without scoldings or citations from Mr. Ranger:

    • Choose existing campsite in a used area – rather than creating another rock ring & trampling a fresh spot.
    • Always know fire conditions; get a fire permit if you have a campfire outside of a developed campground.
    • Set up camp away from other people. The majority of people go to the wilderness to experience quiet, peace, & solitude. There is plenty space for everyone, so spread out.

    mountains

    • Never set camp in a meadow. It is a very fragile ecosystem.
    • Use an existing camp site when possible. Rebuilding and cleaning campfire pits is part of the job!
    • Camping right on the a creek bed or lake shore is damaging to the vegetation and wildlife areas. Place tent at least 20+ feet away from waters edge. Many camp site already exist in prime areas on creek front, so seek out those first. The deeper you go into the wood, the more you will find. Seclusion is possible, if you want to drive beyond the pavement.
    • Do not camp beneath large dead trees. Check tent spots for old overhanging branches too.
    • Do not camp near a mine shaft; Toxic heavy metals or radioactive debris could be present in the dirt.
    • Camping next to a lake, wetlands or a meadow can often result in abundant mosquitoes & insects overall.
    • Snow is possible anytime from October to May above 5000′ elevation. Chilly nights are common in summer.

    deserts

    • Avoid camping inside desert canyons when the threat of rain is approaching: possible flash floods.
    • Consider the benefits of potential windbreaks in desert terrain. Large rocks, bushes, trees, your vehicle & even a hillside.
    • Picking a camp spot on a ridge line means sun exposure and windy conditions. Breezes will keep the bugs away and you can’t beat the better view, but wind can pick up at any time especially in desert regions.
    • Low elevation in late spring and fall means very warm temps; summer is triple digit heat most days.
    • Do not camp near a mine shaft; Toxic heavy metals or radioactive debris could be present in the dirt.

    coastal

    • Avoid camping on fragile coastal cliffs; unstable, which can give way, caving in, resulting in danger to you.
    • Camping on the beach means watching the tides. Know where high water mark is before you set camp up.
    • Beach camping in early summer means low clouds and fog are likely. June Gloom can last months.

    countryside

    • Avoid building campfires up against a large boulders or against a rock face.
    • Rivers controlled by hydroelectric dam systems mean that the water levels can change at any time without warning.
    • Never set camp in a wildflower meadow. It’s too fragile of an ecosystem.
    • Lower elevations in summer time means potential triple digit heat during mid-day.
    • Do not camp near a mine shaft; Toxic heavy metals or radioactive debris could be present in the dirt.
    National Parks National Forests State Parks California BLM OHV routes California Wilderness
    Beach Camping
    California Forests
    Wineries
    Desert Parks
    California Back Roads California Lakes

    Eeeew Bugs

    LadyBugs

    Spiders and Bugs

    terrachula If insects are your biggest concern when camping, then consider yourself totally “spoiled rotten”. Grasshoppers, ladybugs, beetles, butterflies, dragon flies, damsel flies, bumble bees and honeybees are usually not feared, but other bugs are more frightening looking or just extremely annoying.

    Some of the most common pests you will experience in California –

    • mosquitoes (warm weather & near water sources)
    • yellow jackets (they want meat or sugar)Alabama Hills Lone Pine
    • horse flies (near coast & in the mountains)
    • small black flies (near oak groves and pinyon forests)
    • no-see-ums (tiny gnats, zip the tent up)
    • moths (@ night, attracted to lights)
    • scorpions (up to 6000′ elevation)
    • terantulas (painful bite, but harmless to humans)

    Follow these tips:

    • Do not camp near any still or stagnant water
    • Do not camp next to meadows
    • Do not wear perfumed products; the less scent the better
    • Build a small fire, smoke will keep most bugs away
    • Zip up tent door (always). Even if you’re just inside for a minute
    • Turn off flashlight before entering the tent. Moths may follow the light in with you
    • Camp in the cooler months, Spring & Fall

    HELPFUL ITEMS to PACK:Coleman Tents

    • Scented Options

      • Candles w/ citronella scent
      • Citronella incense sticks
      • Tiki torches with citronella fuel
      • Green Mosquito Coils (toxic to water sources)
    • Insect Repellent Spray

      • All Terrain Bug Repellent (non-toxic)
      • Deet is simply Poison
      • Citrus scents are effective
      • Combo sunscreen insect repellents are new
      • Avon’s Skin So Soft Lotion is well known for keeping bugs away

      Screen Room – large tent with open walls. Staking this structure down properly is key. Then park your picnic table and chair inside to enjoy a meal in peace.

      Ponds and Meadows
      Ponds and Meadows are areas in the forest where water collects, and mosquitoes are common. When the low temps dip into the 30’s at night, they usually die off.

    West Kern

    festivals kern

    CA Kern / western Kern county

    Kern County is known for its oil, its agriculture, and outdoor recreation. The Kern River is the highlight of the region with lush, green and grey granite canyons, a big reservoir & the Sequoia trees just up the road. On the western side of Kern County are small towns like Frazier Park, the golfing cabin community of Pine Mountain Club, plus the oil meccas of Maricopa and Taft. Expansive Lockwood Valley enters into Ventura County. Cuyama River borders Santa Barbara & SLO counties.

    Much of the western Kern area is rural ranch land, desert or forest. Los Padres National Forest, Chumash Wilderness, Bittercreek Wildlife Refuge, Wind Wolves Preserve, Buena Vista Reservoir, Ballinger Canyon, Hungry Valley and Fort Tejon State Park all call this region home, right on the mighty tangent of the San Andreas fault line. The San Emigdio range and the surrounding mountains of Mt Pinos and Mount Able design a perpendicular range to the Central Cali coastline, connecting the huge Mojave desert to the ocean. Cerro Noroeste is a very scenic drive.

    The 17 mile long Quatal Canyon, where the indian camp of Mahu Tasen hosts a Bear Dance every summer is also a wild place of bird watching, camping and hunting. The indian word for Mount Pinos is “Iwihinmu” – a sacred spot for Chumash Indians, as well as others; Chumash call it the ‘center of the world’. Locals respond regularly with music, hikes, star gazing, drum circles (seasonally) and local festivals (annually) .

    PHOTOS: Los Padres Photos | Miller Jeep Trail Off Roading Photos

    Drum Camp Pinos | Drumming Cerro Noroeste

    Tecuya Ridge

    Tecuya Ridge, Cuddy Valley 4×4 trails can keep you busy for a whole weekend of back road exploring.

    boating, camping, dirt biking, fishing, hiking, horseback, hunting, mountain biking, off roading, skydiving, xc skiing

    DSCN0029

    Quatal Canyon