Tag Archives: back roads

Lassen Camping

NFS ELAM
Elam Creek Campground, Hwy 32

Camping near Lassen Park

Lassen River CampMount Lassen is part of the Cascade Mountain Range, located north of the Sierra Nevada. The Lassen forest encompasses a large area of wilderness land, snowmelt creeks and an abundant dirt road system. Most of which is covered in deep snow about half the year, so plan accordingly.

Plenty of great dispersed camping along the old logging roads in this Lassen Forest area, surrounding the Volcanic National Park; in Northern California. Many dirt roads are graded annually to allow for passenger car access. You can make it way back there in a car – just watch for the mud and some boulders!

lassen maps

Camp fire permits required (see below). Pease try to choose a camp that has been used before and pack out your garbage.

HINT: a USDA Lassen National Forest Map is very helpful when camping these remote, Lassen back roads. Stay away from the crowds, avoid camp fees & really enjoy your vacation.

Camp right on a rushing river, alone. With no one in sight or sound. Have that secluded camping experience you’ve always dreamed about. Fishing, relaxing, maybe some hiking too. Or better, your mountain bike. Plenty forest roads to explore.mountains

Numerous waterfalls to discover, water flowing everywhere. Mount Lassen @ 10,457′ elevation, is often snow-capped year round. This Northern California region is covered with pine forests and volcanic history.

Cool Springs PGE
Cool Springs @ Butt Lake, California
(PG&E Campground)

CAMP LASSEN
is our guide to all camping and campgrounds
in Lassen Forest, Parks and nearby towns

camp

NFS

If you wanna find the nearest biker bar, head over to the rustic and forested Bambi Inn @ Butte Meadows. The place is popular all the time, especially on weekends. Scenic day drive from Chico, located near a nice river and bridge, plus they have cabin rentals too. Sometimes they have big events and it can get pretty crowded and loud w/ drinking and outdoor music.

BSA Camp Lassen is a boy scout camp located E of Chico, off Highway 32 near Butte Meadows, CA

Dispersed Camp sites in Lassen in Lake Almanor Area

campground elev. spots veg toilet water notes
Alder Creek Campground 3900′ 6 pines vault creek March-Nov
Benner Creek Campground 5562′ 9 pines vault creek May-Nov
Black Rock Campground 2100′ 6 pines vault creek year round, fish
Echo Lake Campground 6440′ hike pines none lake May-Nov, no tables
Soldier Creek Campground 4890′ disp pines vault creek May-Nov, fall hunters
South Antelope Campground 2700′ 4 pines vault creek year round
Willow Lake Campground disp pines lake May-Nov, no tables

NORTH LASSEN

Free North Lassen
Free Camping Lassen

Northside of Mount LassenNFSlogo

Excellent back roads camping w/ dense forest and free firewood all over the place (bring hand saw). Dispersed, primitive, free camping, near creek, and highway close. Many forest dirt roads turn offs, all along Highway 44 (California SR 44) near junction w/ Hwy 89 @ Lassen National Park.

Big creeks, dense forests, graded dirt roads, dark night skies. PCT access, trailheads, camping, fishing, hiking, hunting, all along Upper Hat Creek.

Campfire permits (shovel, bucket & water) are required when camping outside of a developed campground. Always check on current fire restrictions. Washed out bridges and landslides are common, which means road closed signs can be found on these remote backroads.

campfire

see also –

Hat Creek Campground
Honn Campground on Hat Creek, Hwy 89
Large Lupine Lassen
Large Lupine on Mill Creek

HatCreekCampgr

Lassen Area Maps –

Lassen Towns –

Creeks along Highway 32 - N of Chico, CA
Creeks along Highway 32 – N of Chico, CA
Lake Almanor, California
Lake Almanor, California
USFS Chester Ranger Station
USFS Chester Ranger Station

Lassen National Forest
Almanor Ranger District
900 E. Hwy 36 | PO Box 767
Chester, CA 96020
530-258-2141


Great Overland Stagecoach Route of 1849

Canon Sin Nombre
Sunset view of Canon Sin Nombre

San Diego County Road S-2

Great Overland Stagecoach Route of 1849Canon Sin Nombre
San Diego County Rd S2
San Diego County Highway S2

The awesome southern California desert, a stretch of road that traverses north-south direction on the west side Anza Borrego Desert; from Interstate 8 up to to Lake Henshaw @ San Felipe Road. Driving north you gain elevation from sandy badlands into the mountains, but trees are few and far off. Exit I-8 at 400′ elevation above sea level and gradually climb to 3000′ – over near Lake Henshaw & Palomar Mountain.

San Diego Road S-2 is about 50 miles long, through very scenic desert with interesting vegetation and paved the whole way. Perfect for RV travelers, as it has many camping options – from freebie, primitive camp spots to private campground resorts. Palm canyon hide-aways, secret shady spots, endless hiking canyons, and a campground with hot springs.

Carrizo Gorge TrestleS2 Road intersects California SR 78 at Scissors Crossing and continues north through the barren San Felipe Hills. The Southern California portion of the Pacific Crest Trail parallels the ridge line on the east side, with the town of Borrego Springs lying behind that ridge at 590′ elevation. The historic mountain town of Julian sits in the hills above Banner Grade (Hwy 78).

California Historical Landmarks, along S2

# 304 VALLECITO STAGE DEPOT
# 472 BOX CANYON (Anza Borrego Desert)
# 639 PALM SPRINGS (Anza Borrego Desert)
# 647 BUTTERFIELD OVERLAND MAIL ROUTE
# 793 SAN FELIPE VALLEY AND STAGE STATION

points of interest along this route:

California Interstate 8
Ocotillo, CA
Yuha Desert
Fossil Shell Canyon (BLM)
Anza Borrego Desert State Park
Mortero Canyon
Dos Cabezas
Carrizo Gorge Wilderness
Carrizo Palms
Carrizo Gorge Railroad Trestle
Carrizo Badlands & Overlook
Canon Sin Nombre
Coyote Mountains Wilderness
THSDmapHollywood & Vine
Fish Creek Wash
Old Carrizo Stage Station
Sweeney Pass
Bow Willow Campground
Canebrake
Agua Caliente Hot Springs
Vallecito County Park
Oriflamme Canyon
Box Canyon Stagecoach Route
Blair Valley
Ghost Mountain
Vallecito Mountains
Pinyon Mountains
Earthquake Valley
Shelter Valley
Scissors Crossing (@ Hwy 78)
Volcan Mountains Wilderness Preserve
San Felipe Creek
PCT – Pacific Crest Trail

 


View Larger Map

Antique signs still on trail (2001)

Smile Cheps

Oriflamme Canyon Anza

More Time, Offline

boulder fire ring

sunflower3There once was a time when we connected more with nature. Before we closed ourselves off, behind the doors and windows, behind the computer screens, before the internet became part of daily life.

Overweight and obesity is now epidemic in America (as if you didn’t notice). Fast food feasting and soda pop, GMO-gut disorders – and yet we’re still frustrated or disappointed with life; Addicted to television, processed food, copious amounts of sugar, daily coffee, butterflysmoking, prescription drugs, and what else. Wi-fi streaming, video games, always indoors, online, enjoying air conditioned cubes. Inactive physically, emotionally vacant, bored with life, but always on social media.

Stop and think. Look what has happened to us.
Is this the life you envisioned?

blue light special

Campfire Community

Cooking over a camp fire and real conversation are just a few examples of what we have lost in our modern world of technology, fantasy and face-time. campfireFresh air, wild flowers, alpine lakes, star filled skies and total silence – all still exist in certain areas, but you must know where to look. Birds and bees, wildlife is disappearing at extinction levels. Pollution, powerful corporations and politics.

Stop and look. See what has happened to earth.
Is this the world you envisioned?

Highland Wildflowers


Gone! Away, split, out of town. Off work, out of school, on vacation. Outdoors, always. Far, far away.
Unplugged, out of range, vacant lands, big trees, open skies, clear views. California is the land of dreams. Opportunity, fantasy, education, agriculture, terrific terrain and epic scenery. Campfires, waterfalls and mountain meadows are waiting for you.

Taking time off of work – or your typical daily routine – is often rewarding physically as well as mentally. Imagine a week away in a gorgeous location, with minimal to do. Really relax, zone out, chill. Gaze at the water, nap in a hammock, find wildflowers, deer bones, or bear fur on a tree. Cook over the campfire, stargaze every night.

Running to a general store for ice will be your biggest task of the week.hiker

Wilderness boundary, abundant dirt roads and freedom; cell phone calls dropped. Beyond the city limits. Well past the county line.

Wilderness Lakes

Roads do lead out of the matrix, if you desire to follow them. Concentrate on a new reality – and disconnect long enough to commune with nature. Find the free time to really relax and re-evaluate life. Explore other options, consider real life in the bigger picture. Hike, bike, walk, camp, birdwatch. Be outdoors, often!

Vbeardrive
Beat the Summer Heat and head to upper elevation Cool Forests
Curly Lupine
Curly Lupine @ Mill Creek, CA

Cheap Road Trips

Total Escape is your California planner. We’ve been doing this “region” for more than 30 years, always focusing on the back roads. Discover hidden secrets, meadows and unknown waterfalls. Find free campsites, canyons, rivers, creeks and new places to explore.

Find something OUTDOORS, this weekend –

canoe

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California A to Z

avoid crowds

back roads

lake list

out of the box

play hooky

recreate

camp fish  4x4

Most popular pages on Total Escape –

Granite Creek
Granite Creek Campground NFS

nicemeadows

23S16 – Sequoia NF

Sugarloaf Ridge, Greenhorn Mts
Alta Sierra, Kern River Canyon

sugarloafrd
Sugarloaf Road, above Kern River Canyon

SOUTH SIERRA: This route is located in between the Western Divide Highway and the cedar community of Alta Sierra, CA

Sequoia Camping

Sugarloaf Ridge: Forest Rd# 23S16 – Thompson Camp Spring, The Den @ Sequoia National Forest

Driving north on Sierra Hwy N of Kernville, California; Passing Fairview & the Johnsondale bridge; After the R Ranch @ Johnsondale, take the left fork on the main highway; After you climb in elevation, look for brown signs on right side of road & turn left on Forest Service Rd# 23S16. Primitive camp sites are located throughout this area along Packsaddle Creek. Do not turn left up Sugarloaf Rd. There are no good camp sites up that way (unless you wanna make one).

RV campers are very common at Thompson Camp Spring, as this road is paved up to this point. The paved road is windy & narrows after this point. It is not advised for trailers or long motorhomes past Thompson.

For the more adventurous, Bear Meadow & Packsaddle Mdw are located up the dirt road a bit on #23S64.

Vsugar

Paved Sequoia route# 23S16 continues to climb, which leads to the Speas Meadow, the Greenhorn Mountains & you best have a real good map if you are heading up this way. 20 miles of awesome open meadows, small streams, dense forest, wildflowers, some primitive camp sites & great viewpoints overlooking the Kern Canyon. All passenger car accessible! Elevations between 6000-7000′. Sugarloaf Peak has cross country skiing.

Side route #23S05 will take you to White River Campground w/ 12 spots. The paved road winds west down the mountain to Posey & eventually Glennville on Hwy 155.

Instead, to easily reach Hwy 155 – you’ll need to get on dirt for a few miles. While on 23S16, look for the Panorama Campground (@ 7400′ elevation w/ 10 sites). Take dirt road #24S15 to get back to civilization @ Alta Sierra, California.

NFSlogo

Sequoia National Forest

Sequoia National Forest MAP

Sequoia Forest Topo Atlas

 

nearby small towns are:

Vbeardrive

kernwildflowers
Kern River Wildflowers (April) w/ Sugarloaf Mountains

Mono Hot Springs

High Sierra Nevada
Mono Hot Springs

Sierra Snowmobile Destination

Mono Hot Pools @ San Joaquin River
Sierra National Forest

Best of both worlds, way back in the boonies – two primitive tubs soaking perched on a soggy hill next to a big river, developed campground below, and a small resort w/ cabins, camping, restaurant and private soaking areas on the other side of the river.

Sierra hot springs15 mi. NE of Huntington Lake off Kaiser Pass Rd. Huntington Lake & Hwy. 168

Two squared cement tubs overlooking the San Joaquin River, deep in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

The coolest thing about this primitive hot springs is that it is a great destination for a one day snowmobile adventure. Rentals are in the nearby community of Lakeshore & the plowed paths are fairly easy to follow. If you plan on visiting the springs, you must not play around in the meadow much, there is plenty great Sierra scenery to be had. The snomo trip is a good 5 hours round trip with a lunch break & dip at mineral spring tubs.

  • backpacking
  • boating
  • camping
  • cross country skiing
  • fishing
  • hiking
  • horseback
  • kayaking
  • mountain biking
  • mountaineering
  • snow mobiling
  • stargazing
  • swimming
Sierra Snow-Mobiling
Sierra Snow-Mobilin’

snomo sierra hot springs

Kasier Pass WildernessWinter: road is closed half the year due to heavy snow. Summer: snow is gone and the road is open.

KAISER PASS ROAD
Large motorhomes, RVs are not allowed on this long, steep, narrow paved route.

Max vehicle length: 25 feet

Take Hwy.168, turn right on Kaiser Pass Rd, just past the big ski resort. Pass the large meadow & follow signs to Mono Springs & Lake Edison. Make sure not to miss the left turn or you may end up at Florence Lake.

Parking near the green bridge over the San Joaquin River & hike over to the tubs on the hillsides. If there are other vehicles parked here, expect to see naked people nearby; Soaking should never be rushed. Clothing is optional – in California.

Green Bridge at San Joaquin Headwaters
camp

Mono Hot Springs Campground NFS

• Elevation: 6700′
• Number of Sites: 30
• Vehicle Accessibility: RV 25′
• Camp Fee: Yes
• Campsite Reservation: Yes
• Toilet: Vault
• Length of Stay: 14 Days
• Season: June – September
• Trailheads: Ansel Adams & John Muir Wilderness

NOTE: This USFS Campground, should not to be confused with the neighboring business, a privately run camp called –

Mono Hot Springs Cafe w/ Cabin Resort

Mono Springs Sign

closest forest, lakes, & destinations:NFS

topo maps for this region:

Parking Spot

Taylorsville Campground

northvalleycurves

Taylorsville Campground

at Indian Valley, Northern Sierra Nevada mountainscampfire

also known as –
Taylorsville County Campground
Taylorsville Community Campground
Taylorsville Park Campground

sepiacampBeautiful North Sierra Nevada. The rural country life is out here… in the mountains of NorthernCal. Cattle ranches, a few sheep, grazing deer, big old barns, bike races and much residential. Taylorsville is a very small town, on the edge of the Indian Valley. Right across the valley from Greenville and Round Valley Reservoir.

All surrounded by Plumas National Forest

campTaylorsville Park Campground

elevation: 3200′
camp sites: 32
piped water near camp: yes
toilets: flush
showers: yes
fee: yes
season: May-October

walktotown
Easy Walk to Town – Taylorsville, CA

The wooded campground is located at the intersection of North Valley Road, Genesee Rd and Arlington Rd –  a few miles off the main highway 89.

Looking for a quiet place to tent camp in between Quincy & Greenville? then this is it. The best developed campground option in the whole region. Closed for winter months – cuz it does snow pretty good up here.

grillsurface

This shaded tent campground loop is on a hillside; across the street from the small rodeo grounds, the community park w/ picnic areas, tennis courts and a small RV park. Campground host located behind the bathrooms.

Nearest local laundromat in nearby Greenville, behind the main grocery market.

showers

bathing… would be nice

Flush toilets and showers, affordable overnight prices, plus ideal walking-hiking-biking location make this a special campground worth mentioning!

  • walk to townhiker
  • mountain biking
  • cycling
  • hiking
  • tennis

taylorsvillecamp

towns nearby:fish

maps of the region:

 

northvalleyrd600


Camp Fires Correctly

desert bonfires
Deserts & beaches are the only places for bonfires.

kill your television

Camp Fires
The heat source, the light source, the cook source, the sock drier, the night supplier, the outdoor LIVING ROOM. The campfire is the center stage for all entertainment, dining, drinking, music, true tales and ghost stories alike.

Since the beginning of time humans have gathered around the campfire at dark. This nightly ritual is built into us on the deepest level. We miss this today. We miss the real conversations, the community, the bonding, the stories, the soul searching. We miss the connection with nature, the fresh air and the great outdoors. The night sky filled with stars and maybe a meteor shower, a hot drink and the glow of the campfire coals. Enjoying the wilderness requires certain skills. FIRE is only ONE skill – for survival, for cooking, for warmth, for safety.

Total Escape is dedicated to those who yearn to camp, often.

In Certain Circles
photo – Charlie Sweeney 2010

Some folks cannot imagine camping without a campfire, but we better get used to it here on the West Coast. Weather patterns swing from years of super-dry drought to deluge and drenching – as we’ve seen of recent in California. Dry conditions means high wildfire dangers, tight camp stove and strict campfire restrictions.

Each California region, National Forests and State Parks have their own fire restrictions, so call ahead to rangers for current fire conditions on the place you wish to visit. Certain mountain locations will ban fires in the back country, fires on the back roads and sometimes in extreme conditions, no fires allowed even inside a developed campground.

Campfire Basics
Sagebrush could be cleared back another few feet, at least.

Campfire Restrictions

fire

California is well known for its unforgiving drought conditions and its seasonal wildfire danger. Always know the fire conditions in the area you plan to camp. Most Southern California regions have banned ‘open campfires’ in forested areas, due to wildfire threat and population density. Call ahead to get an update on road closures and current campfire restrictions. Find California BLM offices & NFS ranger stations

Campfire Permits

If you plan on camping outside of a developed campground, you will need to get a free “camp fire permit”, which can be obtained at the local rangers office.

Find more on FREE camp fire permits

DSCN3700

California Camp Fires

  • RULE # 1 – Never leave a campfire unattended
  • Build campfires in designated rings. Always try to use an existing ring when possible. If you must build a new rock fire ring, follow the guide on FireSafe
  • You will need water source & bucket, plus a decent shovel for building, maintaining and controlling a campfire. BRING enough water & tools with you to control a fire.
  • A ten foot clearance – all around, down to the bare dirt is the best practice. No brush close to the ring, no bushes, no leaves or pine needles. No dry over-hanging tree branches.
  • You might need to clean trash out of the fire pit, so bring heavy duty trash bags, or a spare old box. Shovel comes in handy here.
  • Kindling is key to getting a good fire going fast, so gather more of the small stuff. Wood gathering away from camp is usually better pickens.
  • Use environmentally friendly fire starters (with damp wood, if you must); not the BBQ lighter fluid or gasoline
  • Building fires up against a big boulder scars them w/ black soot, and although it can reflect heat back to you, it is seldom worth the unsightly damage
  • Bring chainsaws or hand saws for cutting your own campfire wood in the forest
  • Gathering wood for fuel — use only dead and down wood
  • A ranger issued “wood cutting permit” is required if you plan on cutting a full cord
  • Firewood page – buying locally, in California
  • Never burn plastics, batteries or other toxic materials in campfires
  • Tossing beer bottle caps into a campfire only litters site for future campers
  • While glass bottle smelting is a real treat among boys at night, which one is actually gonna get their hands dirty & clean up broken glass out of the campfire the following morning?
  • Do not leave any hot coals during the day (if you are away from camp). Winds could pick up.
  • Always douse campfire with water completely when breaking camp. Stir it, feel for heat, and drown it more if you hear sizzling or see bubbling.
  • Read more wild fire / campfire info on our FireSafe page

Drown Fires

Last Final Step
The Final Step of Breaking Camp

 

Campfire Pits & Fire Containers
Campfire Pits & Fire Containers

Stormproof LIghters
Stormproof Lighters

Lakes Basin Recreation Area

Lakes Basin Area, California

Golden gems of California, a collection of alpine lakes on the north end of Historic Gold Country, North Yuba River, Northern Sierra Nevada

lake dunk
EAST of Downieville, CA

California’s Gold Lake and surrounding lakes; the granite spires of the Sierra Buttes and the creeks, waterfalls, headwaters of the Yuba River — total wild beauty. Steep, granite, river canyon from Downieville drive east on Highway 49 from Sierra City to Bassetts, a gasoline and market stop; they have a small hotel there too.

Historic Lodges

Take the left turn, north on to the Gold Lake Highway. The alpine and extremely scenic Lakes Basin Area consist of all small lakes in between Hwy 49 to Hwy 89, along GOLD LAKE HWY [Road S620] some maps read Road #24 or call this Gold Lake “Road” instead of highway. Snow closes in this route during winter months.

The impressive Lakes Basin Gold Lake Region is in the north part of Tahoe National Forest, on the border of Plumas National Forest. Plumas Eureka State Park is also nearby.

Hiking, Camping, Backpacking, Picnicking, Wildflowers, Stargazing, Fishing, Kayaking, XC Skiing, Snowmobiling

Lakes Basin Map

Lakes Basin Campground

California best lake destinations

lakes basin views

Lakes Basin Recreation Area

Sierra Buttes Map


Green Creek Road

Mono County Wildlife Area
Mono County Wildlife Area, Green Creek Road- off Hwy 395, near Bodie

Green Creek California

Eastern Sierra

S of Bridgeport, CA
MONO – Road #142NFS

Toiyabe National Forest
Bridgeport Ranger District

If you are thinking about fishing or camping the Eastern Sierra, North of Bishop & you are not up for the crowds at Mammoth or June Lakes, then try the Bridgeport area, north on Hwy 395. Rural ranch lands along main road, Bodie ghost town turn off across the highway and Virginia Creek Settlement are also nearby

Green Creek is a 11 mile long dirt road in the lush Eastern Sierra the northern portion. The wide, graded dirt road is signed and dead ends at a Toiyabe National Forest campground called Green Creek Campground. The drive up can be washboard bumpy in some parts, but that doesn’t stop the hundreds of adventurous motorhomes that make this trek annually. This place features some of the best prime Sierra back roads camping options for RVs.

Another dirt route, Dunderberg Meadow Road peels off to the left. Dunderberg departs  off Green Creek a couple of miles from the highway and well maintained. This route leads to meadows, aspens, picture perfect scenery and much more seclusion. Passenger car accessible, wide graded dirt roads to wilderness edges. Two-track one lane trails lead to meadow edges and more creeks. Very impressive views of the Sierra peaks over here on this side. Meadows are sensitive areas, wonderful for picnics and you should always minimize impact.

State Park California

Green Creek Wildlife Area
Mono County, California

Aspen Grove Camping for RVs

  • alpine lakes
  • backpacking
  • bird watching
  • camping
  • creeks
  • day hikes
  • fishing
  • hiking
  • horseback
  • hunting
  • mountain biking
  • wildlife
  • wilderness

Plain old passenger cars can easily make this route deep into the Eastern Sierra aspen canyon. Graded dirt and4x4 could be needed winter months. Backpackers can enjoy easy access to the Hoover Wilderness trailheads. There is plenty semi-primitive camping spots along the way, right on the creek, for free…. so no need to sleep in your vehicle upon arrival.

Autumn Aspen Groves: fall colors peak in October, which is usually when the first snows for the winter season start. November – usually the freeze gets them and lifeless brown leaves dangle, until the Sierra Nevada wind gust blow real good.

camp

Green Creek Camping

DIRT ROAD CAMPING

  • alpine lakes
  • backpacking
  • car camping
  • day hikes
  • fishing camping
  • meadows
  • RV camping
  • tent camping

Hoover Wilderness

Dispersed, primitive camp spots along this main dirt road are on a first come basis. You’ll need a fire permit. Many flat camps are set along the creek in aspen groves, some pines, others have  cubby hole privacy. Large granite valley, big creek, bird, scenery and nature everywhere.  Some folks spend weeks camping out here in the warm weather months. Fishing is a big attraction.

Old Cabin in autumn leaves, up near the top of the dirt road deep in the aspen grovesNFS

Green Creek Campground USFS
7500 elevation
11 camp sites
fee, open May – October
trailhead parking nearby

hiking trails lead to

hikes

TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS:

Aspen Camp

Cuyama Valley

Cuyama River Valley, California

Ventucopa WineriesNorth of Ojai, Highway 33 meets Highway 166: Ozena, Ventucopa, & New Cuyama make up the 3 small communities inside the Cuyama River Valley, located in south of the San Joaquin (California’s Central) Valley.

On the outter edge of Santa Barbara County, where Kern, San Luis Obispo & Ventura counties all meet, you can find great solitude, a large red dirt, high desert wash & plenty rural trails. Off-roading, backcountry camping, hiking, mountain biking all over this region.

Ozena Ranger Station sits at the south end of Cuyama, at the intersection of Lockwood Valley Rd & Hwy 33. Ozena Campground with 10 spots @ 3660′ elevation, is to the east off Lockwood.

Nettle Springs Campground (8 spots @ 4400′ elevation) can be accessed via Apache Canyon, a 10 mile long dirt road# 8N06, off Hwy 33

2 smaller campgrounds – Tinta and Ranch Nuevo are on the west side of Hwy 33 & may require a high clearance vehicle to reach. Trails out of these campgrounds lead to the Dick Smith Wilderness.

Chumash Wilderness is just east of Ventucopa, as Los Padres National Forest surround this agricultural valley. Quatal Canyon and Quatal Wash reach from the upper elevations of pinyon pines near Mount Able to Cuyama river bed below, as Cerro Noroeste Road skirts the northern rim of the impressive red rock canyon. Toad Spring Campground is at the top. Apache Saddle and Pine Mountain Club are just east of Quatal Cyn.

Cuyama riverbed follows Highway 33 and then turns west, following Highway 166, past the ranch lands, the volcano hills and notorious Rock Front Ranch.

All the pavement around Cuyama is very popular amongst motorcyclists. Scenic touring kinda roads. A very nice 100 mile loop trip is from Pine Mountain Club – W on Mil Potrero Hwy, W on Cerro Noroeste Rd, W on Hwy 166, S on Hwy 33, East on Lockwood Valley Road – back to Frazier Park & I-5 Lebec.

Mahutasan, the indian sweat lodge and the extremely rustic Sage Brush Annies Restaurant w/ winery are the highlights of this rural agriculture valley called Ventucopa CA. Cuyama Peak and fire lookout tower overlooks the whole Cuayama Valley & can be accessed via Santa Barbara Canyon Rd. 4×4 may be required in certain spots. This lovely oak and manzanita lined canyon was scorched by the Zaca Wildfire in mid 2007.

  • Cuyama Wineries
  • Pistacio Orchards
  • Quatal Canyon
  • Ballinger OHV Park

helpful maps of the region –

towns in the valley –

towns close by –


View Larger Map

Hwy 166 Wildflowers, School House Canyon
Hwy 166 Wildflowers, School House Canyon


Borrego Camping

Anza Borrego Park / Anza Borrego Campgrounds

DSCN0034

California Highway 78 cuts across Southern California and right thru the middle of the largest State Park in the lower 48. Anza Borrego Desert State Park is a place that must be visited more than once to really take in all the beauty it has to offer. Free camping in Southern California is abundant here, if you are willing to follow the primitive camp fire rules of the park and you are comfortable camping away from developed campgrounds.

North-South: San Diego County Road S2 skirts the western border with Laguna Mountain towering above. It starts at Ocotillo @ Interstate 8 and heads Northwest to Lake Henshaw at Warner Springs.

East-West: a major route S22, connects Ranchita /Montezuma Valley to the Borrego Valley, and continues East to the Salton Seawhataview. The center of the parks is pretty much the town of Borrego Springs, where the State Parks visitors center is located. San Diego County Road S3 leads from Hwy 78 down the the town of Borrego Springs Valley.

developed campgrounds:

free camping: While the camping facilities listed above provide picnic tables and toilets, or more luxury camping… Total Escape thinks the best part of camping in Anza Borrego Desert is the vast amount of free, open camping available on most back roads. Hundreds of dirt roads lead off in all directions, so you can find the peace and solitude that few inside busy campgrounds ever experience.

  • Anza Borrego Desert Map
  • San Diego Backcountry Map
  • Many Anza desert routes are sandy washes, dirt roads, some for high clearance vehicles only, or 4WD in several canyons. Often there is no signs telling you need 4×4 to proceed. May only find out when its too late and you’re stuck.

    Have a good dirt road map with you and know your vehicles limitations. Passenger cars should be very cautious off road. Cell phone coverage is spotty out here in the most remote wilderness areas. oystercamp

    California Motorcycle Roads

    CA motorcycle roads

    These are the roads that drivers love. More room to roam, more space, more pavement, more scenery to love and less people, less drivers and less distractions. California has endless roadways that wind through every part of the entire state. If you enjoy real driving in California, you like the curvy roads & scenery. Total Escape  has dedicated numerous hours to the collection of back roads in California. Some paved, some not.

    4000 RPMs or higher / Cerro Noroeste Road to Hwy 166

    CALIFORNIA driving WAYS & ROADS

    CALIFORNIA SCENIC HIGHWAYS & MAIN ROADS

    free stickers
    get your free sticker

    singlelanerd

    MAPS, PARKS & LINKS

    see also

  • Motorcycle California
  • California Back Roads (mostly dirt)
  • scenic drives
    Some random road east of Trinity River

    Wildrose Campground

    Wildrose Campground – Death Valley

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    Wildrose is an all-season campground in Wildrose Canyon, on the western edges of Death Valley National Park. This canyon gets very windy, so bring your guy lines, stakes & ropes for securing your tent. Motorhome RVs can make it in here, since the narrow road is a paved route – but be warned it can be curvy and slow going with the climb in elevation. This camp stays cooler than anything on the desert valley floor, so in summer months it can fill up quickly. Further up the hill are both ThorndikeMahogany Flat Campgrounds (both close in winter, due to snow)

    • Elevation: 4,100′
    • Number of Sites: 30
    • Vehicle Accessibility: Open to all
    • Campsites Reservation: No
    • Length of Stay: 30 Days
    • Season: year round

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    Directions:

    From Stovepipe Wells, follow Highway 190 W to Emigrant Canyon. Turn left on Wildrose Road and follow it thru the tight rocky canyon, climbing in elevation the whole way. Wildrose Campground is obvious and near the charcoal kilns turn off.

    From Panamint Valley, take Wildrose Road up.


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    Death Valley MAPS –

    Death Valley Park – NatGeo
    Death Valley Topo Map – Tom Harrison

    Nearby attractions:

    Death Valley National Park
    Panamint Valley
    Ballarat Ghost Town
    Skidoo Town Site
    Charcoal Kilns
    Telescope Peak
    Tuber Canyon
    Tucki Mine

    Los Angeles Back Roads

    Angeles Crest Back Roads – Angeles OHV Routes & Trails

    Mt. Gleason Road / Santa Clara Divide Rd.

    Angeles Crest Hwy.2 , North 9 mi. Left onto Angeles Forest Hwy.N3, drive 12 mi. to intersection of Santa Clara Divide Rd.

    • Turn left on paved road to Mt. Gleason. Many dirt roads will eventually branch off on the right side. A forest service map is advised for dirt road exploration.
    • LOOP -Turn right & go up the mountain past Mt. Pacifico & beyond (eventually hooks back up with Hwy.2 near Chilao area.(Check with ranger if your planning on doing this loop to make sure all gates are open)

    Angeles Forest provides over 300 miles of designated OHV roads/routes. When off-roading, all vehicles must meet DMV standards for mufflers & registration. Off-highway smaller vehicles must be equipped with approved spark arresters & have valid green stickers. State law requires that ALL ATV riders wear a helmet.

    • Rowher Flats OHV Area – Santa Clara/Mojave Ranger Dist
    • Littlerock OHV Area – Santa Clara/Mojave Ranger Dist
    • San Gabriel OHV Area – San Gabriel Ranger District

    California Trail Ettiquette –

    CLOSURES: Occasionally areas may be closed due to emergency situations, for resource protection, or during specific seasons when disturbances may drive animals from important habitat. These closures are usually temporary, and your patience and cooperation is appreciated.

    RESPECT THE LAND DUDE

    • Stream banks & lake shores are especially sensitive areas; VERY susceptible to damage. These waterway & creeks in California, are sources of food and shelter to wildlife.
    • Cross streams at a 90° angle at a slow speed and – DickHead, do not travel up & down stream channels. These are precious areas.

    LEAVE A GOOD IMPRESSION: Around developed sites, give other folks the space and quiet you would appreciate. Space out the RVs if possible. It’s not an RV park kinda deal. By law OHV traffic are permitted to exit & enter campgrounds, but not to PLAY within a campground. No one likes dusty salsa. If your muffler is not quiet (you’re an ass!), push your machine in the campground, with the engine shut off.

    STAY ON THE TRAIL: Cutting switchbacks, taking shortcuts or hillside climbing may be a big thrill & challenge, but once vehicle scars the earth, other vehicles follow. The mob mentality maybe, Macho shit. The deep muddy ruts do long-lasting damage to vegetation, plus it doe not help w/ erosion. Rains cause further damage by washing deep gullies in tire ruts. Vegetation & wildlife habitat is lost. Ugly, permanent, unsightly scars on the earth result. Staying on trails helps protect the land. And helps keep trails open!!

    Become a Adopt-a-Trail Volunteer – contact your local NFS
    Outdoor Volunteering in California!

    Angeles Forest – LA Back Roads

    nearby towns –

    Angeles Maps – hiking, OHV & mountain biking –