Kirch Flat Campground

Kirch Flat NFS
Camp Kings River

kirch flat

Low elevation Western Sierra: a big river at the beginning of Kings Canyon. Fishing, biking and hiking. The Kings Cyn National Park is directly east, upriver.

Oak woodlands, steep granite canyons, waterfall hikes, rock beaches, river fishing, mountain biking and wildflowers. Day time temperatures get triple-digit in summer months, so best time to visit is the rest of the year. Small RV accessible, paved road, river close – and best of all, open all year long!

flora west sierra

Kirch Flat Campground

Due EAST of Fresno, California in a large river canyon, Western Sierra Nevada
Located 18 miles up Trimmer Springs Road (paved), 5 miles above Pine Flat Lake. Sierra National Forest; River rafting take-out spot for Middle Kings River.

• Elevation: 1100′
• Number of Sites: 17
• Camp Fee: No
• Vehicle Accessibility: RV 22′ max
• Campsites Reservation: No
• Length of Stay: 14 Days
• Season: Open Year Round
• Trailheads: Kings River

lowerkings

see also Kings River Camping

nearby destinations –

Big Creek Rd #9
Blackrock Reservoir
Dinkey Creek
Dinkey Lakes Wilderness
Fresno, CA
Kings Canyon NP
Monarch Wilderness
Pine Flat Reservoir
Reedley, CA
Shaver Lake, CA
Sierra National Forest
Sequoia NP
Wishon Reservoir

Culp Valley

vegculpvalley

Anza Borrego Camping

Culp Valley Campground

Anza Borrego Desert State Park
Southern California, high desert; in between Temecula & Borrego Springs, CA

Culp Valley Primitive Camp Area, Anza Borrego

San Diego Deserts, San Ysidro Mountains
Montezuma Grade
Montezuma Highway, Hwy S-22

High desert elevations, large boulders, highway w/ primitive campground. No trees, but much vegetation; flat parking, large tent spots, picnic tables, vault toilet. High desert mountain pass, with boulders, canyons and many dirt roads to explore.

• Elevation: 3,350′
• Number of Sites: 10
• Vehicle Accessibility: all
• Campsites Reservation: No
• Camp Fee: No
• Length of Stay: 10 Days
• Season: October – May
• Trailheads: Grapevine Canyon, Pena Springs, Anza Borrego & PCT (Pacific Crest Trail)

culp valley

hike highcountry borrego

Culp Valley Trail, Grapevine Canyon, Montezuma Valley, Pena Springs, San Ysidro Mountains.

  • bouldering
  • camping
  • climbing
  • hiking
  • mountain biking
  • off-roading
  • picnic
  • stargazing
  • wildflowers
  • culptoilet

    2018 Wildfire Walk – Culp Valley
    https://www.parks.ca.gov/Events/Details/9825

    Summit Post for Culp Valley
    https://www.summitpost.org/culp-valley/931432

    culpvalleyOHV

    OHV trails SoCal Deserts

    Bear in California

    California Black Bears

    California Black Bears

    Although the grizzly bear image graces the state flag, grizzlies were killed off during the gold rush days. Black bears are found in California mountains and foothills, down to lowest elevations in NorCal. California black bears come in more than one color –  light brown, cinnamon, dark brown, and of course, black. For the most part, bears usually stay away from people.

    Some areas are more prone to bear problems due in large part to the overpopulation of tourists and abundance of food provided by them. Certain California National Parks are particularly notorious for their brazen bear populations. Concentrated bear problems are sometimes posted so be very aware.

    Bear Habitat

    Follow some simple rules:

    • Keep a very clean campsite
    • Clean up all dirty dishes & beverage containers (especially before bedtime)
    • Keep clothing & sleeping bags free of food odors or heavy scents
    • Never leave any type of food garbage outside of a cabin or mountain home
    • Store garbage properly inside a locked, sturdy container inside garage or a shed
    • Stay away from bear cubs, there is sure to be a mother in close proximity
    • Try not to hike alone. Make noise & sing on trails to scare away any unwanted animals.
    • Bear storage canisters are available at sporting good stores & at stores in most National Parks.

    Proper Food Storage Outdoors:

    Bear Boxes @ Campground

    Store food in closed up automobile, not visible. Store food correctly: in trunk of your car, or hidden from sight; in campground food lockers when available.

    Lock all food, beverages and coolers in the provided metal bear boxes or bear lockers where available.

    Toothpaste, deodorant & anything that has a scent should be thought of as food and stored accordingly.

    Bears are so strong they can rip your car door open (in places like Yosemite, where bears are problem and you can get cited for not storing food items properly)

    Bears are so strong they can break open a garage door to get to the smelly trash inside, so make sure you utilize the curbside pickup service available in some mountain communities or take a trip to the dump once per week.

    carcampers

    DO NOT LEAVE FOOD OUT, UNATTENDED, outdoors…
    during a picnic lunch, during a barbeque, or dinner at the campfire.
    (Birds, dogs, squirrels and wild animals can move in quickly.)

    Backpackers should hang food in nylon bag & drape over weak branch in high in tree: hang your food using the counterbalance method. Ranger who issues your wilderness permit can explain the hanging procedure;

    2 stuff sacks (with drawstrings) for your food items, and 60 feet of medium weight cord. 2 carabiners make hanging much easier.

    Bear Canisters

    Bear Canisters

    for your food
    when exploring the wilderness

    hikers tent campers mountains rivers picnic lakes

    Bear Repellent / Bear Mace
    Bear Pepper Spray

     

    Additional Storage Tip

    As for storing food inside cars:

    When primitive car camping on a dirt road, which does not have campgrounds, nor bear lockers, it is possible to store food in the vehicle. BEST location is on the front floorboards with towel over it. With the car alarm set at bedtime, any ruckus should trigger a decent alarm. Any large animal trying to break in will get blasted with alarm siren & most likely will run away. The noise will wake you up as well, to deal with the intruder, if need be.

    If a bear does get into your camp area:

    • Make as much noise as possible: yell, bang pots/pans, whistle, air horn and get your bear mace or pepper spray ready in hand
    • Raise your hands up to appear larger
    • Get your entire camp group together, join hands and spread out everyone at the camp should be outside the tents in order to be as effective as possible
    • Throw rocks & small objects
    • If possible, try to get to your car for protection & honk the horn
    • If a bear charges at you, drop to the ground and curl up in a tight ball. Cover your head, face and vital areas. Play dead.

    If you encounter a bear on a hiking trail:

    • Make as much noise as possible while walking solo. Hum, sing, talk to the birds. Sing or talk to yourself – out loud.
    • Carry bear spray (mace or pepper) or a weapon for added protection
    • If a bear approaches: stand still, slowly retreat, say a few calming words in a friendly voice and never make eye contact
    • If a bear charges at you, drop to the ground and curl up in a tight ball. Cover your head, face and vital areas. Play dead.

    bearcreek

    California Camping River

    map river | hiking river | map gorge

    California River Maps

    Tent Camp Yosemite Valley

    There are many gorgeous rivers in California that are perfect for camping and fishing, but none are located in Southern California. None! Yep, you read that right. If you think about it, the golden state is about half desert! The majority of our natural water in our state is coming from the north – so take this as a warning: you might need to drive a few hours to find your ideal river camp.

    The easy-to-access waterways are found mostly along highways in the Sierra Nevada – or way up in NorCal. Deep granite gorges carved out by glaciers, surrounded by forested peaks is only half the appeal. High elevation lakes, waterfalls, big trees, abundant wildlife, and the alpine villages are all part of the Sierra Nevada experience.  Raft, kayak, fly fish, hike, bike or just camp out next to a big, rushing, flowing river. Our selection of California maps will get you narrowed down to a specific region, so you can find that perfect river campground, or explore and discover the back roads – for the most seclusion.

    NorCal Rivers:

    EEL RIVER
    KLAMATH RIVER – Klamath NF Map
    MAD RIVER – NFS Campground
    MATTOLE RIVER
    McCLOUD RIVER
    NAVARRO RIVER
    NEW RIVER
    NOYO RIVER
    PIT RIVER
    RUSSIAN RIVER
    SACRAMENTO RIVER CAMPING
    SALMON RIVER
    6 RIVERS NATIONAL FOREST
    SMITH RIVER
    TRINITY RIVER
    VAN DUZEN RIVER

    Sierra Rivers:

    AMERICAN RIVER – El Dorado NF Map
    CONSUMNES RIVER – Stanislaus NF Map
    FEATHER RIVER Recreation Map
    FEATHER RIVER – Plumas NF Map
    KERN RIVER – Sequoia NF Map
    KAWEAH RIVER – Sequoia
    KINGS RIVER
    KINGS RIVER – Sequoia Kings Canyon Map
    KINGS Cyn NP
    MERCED RIVER – Sierra
    MERCED RIVER – Yosemite Map
    MOKELUMNE RIVER – El Dorado NF Map
    OWENS RIVER – Inyo NF Map
    SAN JOAQUIN RIVER – Sierra NF
    SOUTH YUBA RIVER Recreation Map
    STANISLAUS RIVER – Sonora Pass
    STANISLAUS RIVER – Stanislaus NF Map
    TULE RIVER – Sequoia
    YUBA RIVER – Tahoe NF Map

    LOCAL TIPS for RIVER DESTINATIONS

    calmrivers

    KERN RIVER: The Kern River is one of the most popular of all the Sierra rivers due to its proximity to SoCal. Hurried, stressed-out, Angelinos (LA) can be at this destination in under 3 hours which makes it a very busy place most warm months. So, let it be told, that summer is not the best time to enjoy the Kern. If you do plan a summer outting, make sure you head for the Upper Kern (10+ mi N of Kernville & Lake Isabella) or the North Fork of the Kern (out in Monache Meadows) where 4×4 is often needed.

    The Lower Kern River has only 2 developed campgrounds: Hobo (closed for winter) and Sandy Flat (open all year). Numerous primitive camp spots are available along Old Kern Canyon Rd, which parallels the Hwy 178 on the south side. None of which are located at the rivers edges. Fire danger is great in this area, so pay extra close attention to signs and fire restrictions.

    Beer at River

    YOSEMITE RIVER: Take note, this is the most popular park in the whole state. The majority of campers want to stay right on the river when they visit Yosemite National Park, but that is just plain old impossible, since reservations go fast and there is only so much room for everyone in this enclosed, narrow, precious valley. This particular park has some major floods (1997 & 2005) that wipe out bridges, the road ways, all the old wooden cabins (at Yosemite Lodge) are gone and only half of the campgrounds are still available. Yosemite has had 11 winter floods since 1916 that have caused substantial damage to property. Reservations are taken for camping and cabins – far in advance; like one year. No joke!

    CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS

    3 Yosemite Campgrounds are located next to the Merced River (inside spectacular Yosemite Valley)

    hikehike

    Way up in the Yosemite high country which is only open a few months outta the year, the beautiful Tuolumne Meadows Campground is located next to lush meadows and the scenic Tuolumne River. All Yosemite campsites must be reserved well in advance, so click the links above – if you are serious about a Yosemite camping trip.

    Mokelumne

    STANISLAUS RIVER: The Sonora Pass, the fishing is very decent way back in this granite gorge. The highway 108 is only open a few months outta the year, due to snow & rock slides – so time is of the essence. Summer time that is. Several campgrounds are located right on the river, or on the major feeder streams. Or you can opt for secluded primitive camping on the back roads. Find Sonora camping in Stanislaus National Forest.

    YUBA RIVER: The biggest play time river in the northern Gold Country, this runs along Hwy 49 near Downieville and also has a major South Fork for the best swimming holes and primitive camping in this region. Tubing, rafting, kayaking, fishing, camping, gold panning, you name it, Yuba has it. Look for more on the South Yuba Recreation map, or Plumas National Forest map.

    FEATHER RIVER: The top fishing river in the Lassen – Lake Oville area. Chester and Lake Almanor in the upper reaches. High Bridge Campground is nice paved-camp-site camping; a forested spot where you can fish 2 rivers on the same day. A Plumas NF or Lassen NF map would be quite helpful for this region. Lower down the mountain, lower Feather Rivers which include all 4 forks which feed Lake Oroville – West Fork, North Fork, Middle Fork Feather, and the South Fork. Lots of waterways to explore in between Chico and Quincy.

    KINGS RIVER: This one particular river is the longest in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, pulling snow melt from the upper reaches of the High Country and Mount Whitney. The river area just to the West of the National Park, over to Pine Flat Reservoir, is all prime for outdoor recreation. Several river rafting companies work this stretch of river.

    CAMP FOUR & A HALF CABIN RENTAL
    NFS KINGS RIVER
    NFSrangers

    hikehike

    Kings River Rafters

    Humboldt Beach Camping

    Humboldt Camping Sites

    dscn0088

    The sheer beauty of real weather, the clashing storms and ocean with the land. Cold and wet half the year (or more), Northern Cal has less people and more scenery. More nature, more land, more forests, more view points, more wild beauty – than the rest of the California coast.

    Maybe more hippies too!

    The fantastic coastlines of Northern California are forested, rugged, rocky and they receive a lot more rain than the rest of California. Coastal fog or deep cloud layers are common, even in warmer months.

    Tall cliffs, large lagoons, rural towns, and foggy beaches. Beaches filled with small rocks. No sand? Minimal access to the coast in some areas.

    Super tall, coastal redwood trees thrive along this oceanfront wildness. They are located just a skip away from the sea. Most groves located miles inland, near US 101 highway. Close enough, but not out there on the windy beach, exposed with the elements.

    redwood101

    NorCal Coast Campgrounds are located generally along river ways, near redwood forests and near paved roads. Redwood Campgrounds are all over up here. Literally, everywhere. Some camps are better suited for RV campers than others. A few parks have walk-in or hike-in access to camp sites.

    Several redwood parks are 20 miles from the coast, so know the exact location before you book a campsite online. Driving “over to coast for a quick day trip” is no easy task, since routes can be narrow backroads with many curves. Pavement, if you’re lucky.

    listed below:
    camps actually located at the coastline are labeled in bold text

    When the weather is warm and sunny, people – flock to the hidden coves, rugged beaches, or they float, kayak, fish or raft on the rivers, or the enjoy long day hikes.

    CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS

    blue links lead to camp reservation services.

    NorCal Redwoodsstate parks
    State Parks 
    & Campgrounds

    Humboldt Lagoon State Park

    • Stone Lagoon Campground
    • Dry Lagoon Hike-in Sites

    Humboldt Redwoods State Park & Campground camp

    Little River State Beach Campground

    Patricks Point State Park Campground  camp

    Prairie Creek Redwood State Park camp

    • Butler Creek Walk-in Camp
    • Elk Prairie Campground
    • Gold Bluffs Campground

    Richardson Grove State Park camp

    humboldtSP

    Some redwoods parks are open year round, others only in summer months. Reservations for campgrounds is common along this desired vacation region of California. River kayakers, mountain bikers, tent campers, avid hikers, road trippers and RV campers.

    camps actually located at the coastline are labeled in bold text

    California Redwood forests are found along the NorthCoast; coastal redwoods. And in the Sierra Nevada mountains; those big redwoods are called Sequoias.

    see more big, old trees

    redwood parks

    Humboldt County Parks with Camping

     

    Lost Coast Camping BLM BLM camping

    USA Lumber Company

    USA Lumber (historic site) & Campground

    Usal Beach Campground
    (on the border of Mendocino and Humboldt Counties)

    Flint Ridge Campground
    (on the border of DelNorte and Humboldt Counties)

     

    redwood parks

    Black Sands Beach, California

    Humboldt towns along the coast –

    (listed from south to north)

     

    Lost Coast Drive Dirt Roads

    Lost Coast: Drive Dirt Roads – USAL ROAD# 431, this road is the hard left off HWY 1, just as it peels away from coast and heads into redwoods and US 101. Follow this dirt and gravel scenic wonder drive out to Usal Beach Campground, Sinkyone Wilderness and Shelter Cove. The pavement picks up again near Honeydew, a rugged 30-something miles north. Real 4×4 may be needed in wet weather.