Sacramento River Camping

The Sacramento River of Northern California

The main artery from the North; the Big River of California

Sac River California

Mighty Mount Shasta snowmelt flows south, bound to meet the giant Lake Shasta, which merges with the Pit River and numerous other major waterways, becoming the big Sacramento River. Running right down the center of the North Sacramento Valley to merge into the California Delta. Shipping channel links the State Capital city of Sacramento with the San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Agriculture and wildlife depend on this river heavily.

tent camping camp sites, campground camping, RV camps, dump stations, marinas, bait, gasoline, public boat ramps, boating, fishing, kayak rentals

Redding Winters

CAMPGROUND PARKS below listed from NORTH to SOUTH

JGW RV Park
Riverland Drive
South Redding, CA

Sacramento River RV Park
Riverland Drive
South Redding, CA

Wildlife Refuge
Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge
Willows, CA
~ Camping is not permitted on the Sacramento NWR. Along the Sacramento River, camping is permitted on GRAVEL BARS for up to 7 days during a 30 day period. For waterfowl hunting, overnight stay is permitted in a vehicle or RV in designated areas. Tents are prohibited. No person may build or maintain fires except in portable gas stoves.

Orchards

Chico Area

Lake Red Bluff Recreation Area
Red Bluff, CA

Driftwood RV & Fishing Resort
@ Mill Creek Park
Los Molinos, CA

Hidden Harbor Marina & RV Park
Los Molinos, CA

River’s Rest Resort
Los Molinos, CA

Woodson Bridge RV Park
Corning, CA

State Parks
Woodson Bridge State Recreation Area
Historic State Park w/ Campground
South Avenue (A9)
Corning, CA

Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park
Chico, CA

Colusa Landing & RV
Butte Slough Road
Colusa, CA

State Parks
Colusa-Sacramento River State Recreation Area
Colusa SRA Camping

Camping Colusa

Tent Camping Colusa SRA

California Delta Region

State Parks
Brannan Island State Park
Rio Vista, CA

Sandy Beach Solano County Park
2333 Beach Drive
Rio Vista, CA

Vieira’s Resort
California Delta
Isleton, CA

State Parks
Old Sacramento State Historic Park
Downtown
Sacramento, CA

Sacramento Hostel, see more budget lodging

Campfires in California

Campfires on the Back Roads

Campfires on the Back Roads: shovel & water bucket required

When & Where – Campfires in California

California has many different National Forest districts and each region has their own fire restrictions. State Parks & BLM also manages recreation areas & camping in the Golden State. Each agency & region has different rules, so blanket answers cannot apply to general questions on campfires.

CAMPFIRE PERMITS
Campfire permits are required for fires outside of designated recreation sites (not during fire restriction period). Campfire Permit are available from Forest Service, CalFire or BLM offices or online, http://www.preventwildfireca.org/

Current Fire Restrictions:
California suffers more from wildfires now than ever before. Drought conditions or record winter rains, the huge population means fire danger. By mid summer we have usually have several wild land fires burning, which means campfire restrictions are usually in place before JULY 4th weekend. When this happens – No open campfires are allowed in the backcountry or on the back roads.

Often in the driest of years, no campfires are allowed even inside the campgrounds.

tent camping

If you love to primitive camp outside of developed campgrounds, you need to plan more road trips for Spring time & early Summer. Or go desert camping during winter months.

No concise, easy-to-read list or online map exist on which forests are allowing backcountry campfires and which ones are not. It seems to change so often and they aren’t great about updating those .gov web sites.

Best just to call each forest individually and ask rangers about current fire conditions. If you can speak to a field ranger, they can tell you more on dispersed camping. Or you can navigate the USDA web site to find current ALERTS & RESTRICTIONS.

Here is a Total Escape page with all of the California National Forests listed w/ phone numbers
http://www.totalescape.com/active/campstuff/NF/NFS.html

Narrow down a specific region by checking out where fires are active today and selecting a region well away from big fires.
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/?state=5

See more on this topic –

Fire Safety
Camping without a Campfire
Firewood Dealers

Camp Fires Correctly

1N17 – Inyo NF

1N17

Road #1N17 – Inyo National Forest

Highway 158 @ Grant Lake, North June Lake Loop

Forest Road 1N17 is a major graded dirt road that connects June Lake Loop to the Lee Vining junction, the back way. West side of US 395; south of Hwy 120.

At north end of Grant Lake, slow down and look for the signed intersection. Sage brush hills and big drainage, with towering granite peaks above.

This well-traveled, wide dirt road leads along the base of the mountain range on BLM land, skirting the National Forest. Several side routes head up into numerous canyons, which are part of Inyo NF. Suitable for SUV, passenger cars, camper van and small RVs. Easy access off US Highway 395 and June Lake Loop #1S63

side routes off #1N17 –

Parker Lakes Road #1S25A
Sawmill Canyon #1S24
Bloody Canyon #1S23
Walker Lake Trailhead
Bohler Canyon #1S19
Gibbs Trailhead #1S106

walkertrail

Several hike-in only lakes, creek camping, some seclusion. Great picnic areas, trail head access, short or long hikes. National Forest lands. Backpacking, day hiking and primitive camps, some deep in the aspens. Autumn here can be gorgeous, and these are all prime summer time camp sites, for free. Make sure to get your campfire permit ahead of time, at ranger station in Mammoth. Wilderness permits may also be required for overnight camping in this canyon, so check with the NFS rangers on that issue.

towns nearby:
June Lake, CA
Lee Vining, CA
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mono Lake, CA

Ansel Adams Wilderness
Inyo National Forest

Certain areas back here can be muddy in springtime, other major routes can even be over whelmed with water when creeks swell. Summer thunderstorms are common. One lane bridges should always be driven with caution, especially on dirt roads. Always be extra slow when driving thru water at creek crossings.

area maps:
Inyo National Forest USDA
Ansel Adams Wilderness Maps
Mammoth Lakes Map by NatGeo

summerstorm

Bear in California

California Black Bears

California Black Bears

Although the grizzly bear image graces the state flag, grizzlies were killed off during the gold rush days. Black bears are found in California mountains and foothills, down to lowest elevations in NorCal. California black bears come in more than one color –  light brown, cinnamon, dark brown, and of course, black. For the most part, bears usually stay away from people.

Some areas are more prone to bear problems due in large part to the overpopulation of tourists and abundance of food provided by them. Certain California National Parks are particularly notorious for their brazen bear populations. Concentrated bear problems are sometimes posted so be very aware.

Bear Habitat

Follow some simple rules:

  • Keep a very clean campsite
  • Clean up all dirty dishes & beverage containers (especially before bedtime)
  • Keep clothing & sleeping bags free of food odors or heavy scents
  • Never leave any type of food garbage outside of a cabin or mountain home
  • Store garbage properly inside a locked, sturdy container inside garage or a shed
  • Stay away from bear cubs, there is sure to be a mother in close proximity
  • Try not to hike alone. Make noise & sing on trails to scare away any unwanted animals.
  • Bear storage canisters are available at sporting good stores & at stores in most National Parks.

Proper Food Storage Outdoors:

Bear Boxes @ Campground

Store food in closed up automobile, not visible. Store food correctly: in trunk of your car, or hidden from sight; in campground food lockers when available.

Lock all food, beverages and coolers in the provided metal bear boxes or bear lockers where available.

Toothpaste, deodorant & anything that has a scent should be thought of as food and stored accordingly.

Bears are so strong they can rip your car door open (in places like Yosemite, where bears are problem and you can get cited for not storing food items properly)

Bears are so strong they can break open a garage door to get to the smelly trash inside, so make sure you utilize the curbside pickup service available in some mountain communities or take a trip to the dump once per week.

carcampers

DO NOT LEAVE FOOD OUT, UNATTENDED, outdoors…
during a picnic lunch, during a barbeque, or dinner at the campfire.
(Birds, dogs, squirrels and wild animals can move in quickly.)

Backpackers should hang food in nylon bag & drape over weak branch in high in tree: hang your food using the counterbalance method. Ranger who issues your wilderness permit can explain the hanging procedure;

2 stuff sacks (with drawstrings) for your food items, and 60 feet of medium weight cord. 2 carabiners make hanging much easier.

Bear Canisters

Bear Canisters

for your food
when exploring the wilderness

hikers tent campers mountains rivers picnic lakes

Bear Repellent / Bear Mace
Bear Pepper Spray

 

Additional Storage Tip

As for storing food inside cars:

When primitive car camping on a dirt road, which does not have campgrounds, nor bear lockers, it is possible to store food in the vehicle. BEST location is on the front floorboards with towel over it. With the car alarm set at bedtime, any ruckus should trigger a decent alarm. Any large animal trying to break in will get blasted with alarm siren & most likely will run away. The noise will wake you up as well, to deal with the intruder, if need be.

If a bear does get into your camp area:

  • Make as much noise as possible: yell, bang pots/pans, whistle, air horn and get your bear mace or pepper spray ready in hand
  • Raise your hands up to appear larger
  • Get your entire camp group together, join hands and spread out everyone at the camp should be outside the tents in order to be as effective as possible
  • Throw rocks & small objects
  • If possible, try to get to your car for protection & honk the horn
  • If a bear charges at you, drop to the ground and curl up in a tight ball. Cover your head, face and vital areas. Play dead.

If you encounter a bear on a hiking trail:

  • Make as much noise as possible while walking solo. Hum, sing, talk to the birds. Sing or talk to yourself – out loud.
  • Carry bear spray (mace or pepper) or a weapon for added protection
  • If a bear approaches: stand still, slowly retreat, say a few calming words in a friendly voice and never make eye contact
  • If a bear charges at you, drop to the ground and curl up in a tight ball. Cover your head, face and vital areas. Play dead.

bearcreek

Los Angeles Group Camping

Los Angeles Group Camping

Angeles Crest Campgrounds

Angeles

CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS

campground elev spots veg toilet water notes
Bandido Campground 8,700′ 120 pines vault piped Group Camp
Coulter Campground 5,300′ 50 pines vault piped Group Camp
Deer Flats Campground 6,200′ 300 pines flush piped Crystal Lake
Jackson Flat 3,400′ 180 pines flush piped Jackson Lake
Los Alamos Campground 2,600′ 75 sage flush piped Pyramid Lake
Mountain Oak Group Site 5,200′ 15 oak vault piped Wrightwood
Sulphur Springs Campground 5,200′ 80 pines vault piped Chilao Area
Table Mountain Campground 7,000′ 43 pines vault crk Group Camp

nearby towns –

Angeles Maps – hiking, OHV & mountain biking –